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Cricket Club

Cricket Club

May 12, 2016

News from the Cricket Club

41 Comments

  1. Hey you Fordcombe toffs, your village had a football team during the 1950s.
    I would be most interested to read about them here.
    So get to it – chop chop.
    Thanking you wholeheartedly in advance.
    This is a very nice website, but just needs a little lower class content.
    I used to live near Borough Green, and admired Fordcombe FC for their sustained effort and exemplary sportsmanship.
    Enjoy all that cake at the Village Fete!

  2. Those were the days!
    Another team that I admired was Charcott FC.
    Perhaps that veteran fielder, with back to the camera, remembers both clubs?
    He has that classic goalkeeper’s positioning – as about to make a cat-like leap to save.
    He reminds me of former Shipbourne FC goalkeeper, Peter Fairweather – the Tonbridge & District League representative team member during the early 1950s.

    I was into cricket big time, too.
    But it’ s been a long day, and time for cocoa and biscuits right now. But no dunking – my Mum didn’t allow it.
    Cheers! All the best!

  3. That fielder is quite a trend setter, with his/what is it?, tucked down into his nether garment like that.
    I got quite jealous when my girlfriend wouldn’t looking at his stylish stance.
    When is he going to get a haircut?

  4. That is meant to be ‘when my girlfriend wouldn’t cease looking.’
    She said I did that on purpose, so that I could boast about having a girlfriend.
    Women!

  5. My girlfriend says, that fielder is remaining so youthful looking – what with not wearing braces to hold up his trousers, and exposing his ‘Persil white’ socks like that.
    My Mum used to say that ‘Persil washes whiter’, was oh so true. She would never buy a product like Tide.
    I wonder if that fielder uses Persil, when washing his socks?

  6. I might refer to that fielder as ‘Arthur.’
    After Plaxtol born and raised Arthur Fielder that is – not Dudley Moore.
    Or maybe ‘Pip’, the nickname of Mr. Fielder – one of the all-time Kent CCC ‘greats’.
    I wonder if that fielder has a nickname?

  7. Further afield, in a hamlet near Jarvis Brook where they ‘talk sort of funny’, it was mentioned that the photo depicts a ‘cricket match’ which is not taking place.
    That the two gentlemen are ‘acting’ for this.
    I told them they were jealous.
    And muttered: “Sussex born, Sussex bred; Strong in arm, weak in head.”
    Luckily, I had earlier applied some ultra strength ‘Tiger Balm’ ointment to my touch of arthritis, rheumatism, lumbago and sciatica – and managed to leave rather rapidly.

  8. Look at that – young, educated twitterers down the edge of the comments.
    And following closing time at the Chafford Arms – despite insects, dew, frost or whatever – they will probably take an extended snooze on the cricket table, before continuing home.
    Encroachment everywhere nowadays.

  9. Just out of curiosity, what %age of viewers would like to see twitterer, ‘val’s green bikini’, in front of those bushes taking in the cricket?
    Maybe she could be superimposed on same?
    Her swimming costume should not be darker than traffic light green. But then, I’m not fussy about that – as long as she appears to be having a good time, then I’m happy too.

  10. What have those selfish triathlete cyclists got to do with Hever Castle anyway?
    I would like to see them on Fordcombe cricket ground, facing the bodyline bowling of Harold Larwood.
    The wimps would probably be wearing suits of armour.
    I wasn’t able to walk for 5 and a half months, after being hit by one of them.

  11. I’ve got to stop my girlfriend from looking at that photo for a while.
    It’s making her back ache – imagining herself permanently in positions like them.
    And she’s over applying my ultra strength, ‘Tiger Balm’ ointment.
    That stuff’s expensive!
    And you can smell her, almost from Fordcombe to Penshurst.

  12. Talking about fast bowlers…..
    J. C. T. Page was from Mereworth, and played for Kent CCC from 1950 until 1963.
    John was initially opening fast bowler; on switching to off spin he became known as Colin.
    During the late 1940s – at King George’s Field, St. Mary’s Platt – my brother was hit on the head by a delivery from [then] John.
    My brother still shakes his head occasionally – a reminder of one of his claims to fame.

  13. I wonder if the scorer of Fordcombe CC will leave a comment?
    Charles Dickens used to be the scorer during the annual cricket match between Gad’s Hill Place and local Gad’s Hill-ites. He was next best thing to being squire.
    For a few years, prior to the age of 15, I was the scorer for Basted CC. Our closest matches to Gad’s Hill were versus Mockbeggar CC – like Gad’s Hill, also in the Parish of Higham.

  14. As a friend and neighbour, please bear with me!
    Have received a few phone calls regarding last post.
    That was the hamlet of Basted, not Brasted village.
    The club had its idiosyncratic ground on a hillside overlooking the Bourne Valley.
    There are photos from 1903 of the team, and with opponents, on several websites.
    They moved years ago from that rough hewn venue to the more manicured surroundings of Tonbridge Sports Ground.
    I wonder if the club is still going…..

  15. One of those ‘Sussex born, Sussex bred’ acquaintances, has expressed relief that I have not mentioned the demise of Queen Anne.
    Hmm, sort of expecting that…..
    Thinks : maybe I can find/borrow something, written by the talented John Sworder.

  16. That lithe, athletic-looking fielder must be upwards of 47, eh?
    So to maintain my girlfriend’s attention, while looking so splendid in his whiter-whites, he could well be applying the Non-staining, Super Ultra Strength, Tiger Balm Sports Rub ointment, eh?
    And that means he would have the money to spend for it.
    Another plus for him.

  17. It has been often mentioned, that the fielder looks to have remarkable energy.
    And that with so many attractive widows around these days, he must be kept rockin’ away non-stop, at the ‘Early Rock n Roll’ Revival Dances.
    I might try to get back to those ‘daily dozen’ exercises, that were quite common at one time.
    And practice those jive moves, that I remember watching.
    Then get out on the corner of the dance floor one of these nights, build up my confidence, and enjoy some fun-time experiences like the fielder.
    As well as Tunbridge Wells, I’m starting to remember some of those Crowborough dances and girls again.
    Great times and memories!

  18. Surely one viewer anyway, must remember him?
    -or ask your grandparents.
    About that youngish guy in Tunbridge Wells, who ‘looked, sang, played piano, and combed his hair while performing’ like Jerry Lee Lewis.
    He was pretty good.
    The only thing missing was the audience pelting him with tomatoes.
    Some might have to check the internet to find out what I’m referring to.
    Although that fielder would have possessed a cultured throwing action, a Tunbridge Wells audience would never have done anything like that.

  19. My girlfriend is inconsolable at present.
    On clicking to the News from Cricket Club/enlarged photo, the fielder’s sparkling white socks and footwear now disappear.

  20. [interruption/senior moment/am continuing].

    Please, please try to adjust the photo at your earliest convenience.
    My fingers are crossed that this can be achieved by the commencement of New Years celebrations.
    Thank you!
    Happy new year! All the best to one and all!

  21. It’s OK now, I suppose.
    A different web browser is causing what I’ve just mentioned.
    I’ve been, sort of more used to writing postcards.
    Thanks again!

  22. See: September 27 at 6:53 pm.

    Johnnie Geddes played for St. Mary’s Platt CC during the 1920’s/30s.
    During the late 50s, he was mentioning a player with opponents Roydon Hall CC (East Peckham), who had made his own artificial leg out of wood.
    Smart Alec [not me] : “who had made his own artificial leg out of wood – called?”
    Johnnie : “I do not recollect the species of wood used, and probably thought more about the metal working parts he devised. I’ll check prostheses history for a possibility.”
    Smart Alec : “I was thinking of a man with a wooden leg called Smith. I don’t know what the other one was called.”

    Johnnie mentioned that the man’s nickname had been ‘Long John Silver’ – and that he, Long John, used to have a good laugh about it.

  23. Pity that can’t be adjusted, so the fielder doesn’t get chopped off those inches above his ankles.
    She blamed me!
    So I was forced to buy her a large bottle of Bailey’s Irish Cream to make up for it!

  24. ‘The Brothers – A Cricketing Ballad 1915.’
    Written by Miss Oxley.
    Thought you might be interested!

    “All the boys of Borough Green
    Were playing at the ball
    And Dan the captain of the team
    Was smartest of them all.

    The bowler sent the ball right up
    At a tremendous pace
    The bail flew and hit poor Dan
    A fine smack in the face.

    And while he bowed unto the ground
    And hopped about in woe
    Which time the team looked on to see
    The blood began to flow.

    And while they all did ask of him
    If he were better yet,
    His brother George did turn about
    And light a cigarette.

    But like a valiant captain bold
    Dan clean forgave his brother
    Long may they live in Borough Green
    Long may they love each other.”

    The mentioned Crowhurst family – who lived at Whiffen’s Farm, Borough Green – were stalwarts of the Cricket Club from the 1900s to the 1960s.

    In 1938, Dan Crowhurst was still the captain of Boro’ Green CC. His son-in-law Lou Masters, and son Frank Crowhurst, were also players on the team.
    Another son-in-law, Tom Marmont, was playing for Borough Green Wednesday CC.

  25. Google Chrome shows the fielder’s Persil White socks in a larger, brighter, vastly superior version of the photo.
    Microsoft Edge is very poor in comparison.
    My girlfriend insists on using the latter browser.
    I’m sure it’s because she wants to moan at me. And get me to buy her a bottle of Bailey’s Irish Cream every so often.
    Can’t really afford it…..

  26. See October 6 and January 12 comments – have received some phone calls regarding same.
    Most games were played on Sundays at Basted cricket ground.
    On mornings before afternoon games, one of the players would go to nearby Crowhurst Farm, Crowhurst Lane, to borrow the tractor.
    It was hitched up to gang mowers, so that the outfield could be made ready, whilst others prepared the playing strip.
    Callers had mistakenly thought, that the cricketing/farming Crowhurst family, had lived at Crowhurst Farm.

  27. As I commenced by mentioning 2 football clubs, some would like a footballing comment.
    OK, well sort of…..
    Quite a character from the past was known as ‘Bob Dog’.
    He had been employed for a while by the builders Curtis & Caine (later F.P.Caine Ltd.) of Borough Green. I mostly heard workers born prior to WW1 speak about him.
    He used to run head first into the side of the moving company lorry which was being driven by George ‘Bandy’ Fuller. Also head first into brick walls – one of his party tricks was to throw a brick into the air, and then head it.
    Some said that he was thus nicknamed, because he could catch a rabbit with his bare hands. His real name was Frank Hooker and he lived in Addington.
    He played football for a few teams in the area – including while in his fifties, Ryarsh United.
    With the laws of the game preventing him from taking a hod load of bricks onto the pitch, he turned cartwheels during the game.

  28. With a shortage of players, Fordcombe CC just about managed to scrape together a skeleton team.
    Following the match, one of their players walked into the Chafford Arms.
    Bar tender : “What will it be for you then, Sir?”
    Skeleton : “A pint of mild, please – and a mop.”

  29. Re : The Joseph Wells who was born in a cottage at Penshurst Place Estate in 1828.
    His father taught him gardening during his formative years, in the Penshurst gardens. Then obtained an under-gardener position for him at the famous Redleaf Garden nearby. This was during his 16th to 19th years, and he wasn’t too interested at the time.
    During summer, he would run straight from work to Penshurst cricket ground, to get in half an hour of cricket – or until it was too dark to see the ball.
    In June 1862, with his deadly slow spinners and while representing Kent CCC, he became the first bowler in county cricket to take 4 wickets in 4 consecutive balls.
    One of his sons was H. G. Wells.

  30. I’ve been asked to mention these further details.
    In 1843 the head gardener at Penshurst Place, Joseph Wells, put his son Joseph Wells into a place as under-gardener to Redleaf Garden’s head gardener, Joseph Wells.
    William Wells was owner of Redleaf.
    Only the first 2 of the 4 mentioned Wells were related.
    Joseph Wells became head gardener at Redleaf – 12 years before Joseph Wells’ appointment as head gardener at Penshurst.
    The person asking me about this had been a little confused.

  31. See : February 8 post.
    My memory is de-fogging a little.
    It has been mentioned by a former Ryarsh resident, that he knew of Bob Dog, and assumed his Christian name was Robert.
    ‘Everyone’ that I knew called Frank Hooker “Bobdog”/not Bob Dog.
    ‘Bob…’ would have been to represent the idiosyncratic movements that he made.
    A 93 year old lady ‘well remembers Bobdog when he lived in Ryarsh Lane,’ and said his real name was Harry Hooker.
    Frank Hooker was born (and lived) in East Malling in 1901, and lived in several West Malling area Parishes, before he died in 1970.

  32. What with his party trick of heading house bricks, etc., it seems like natural inclination that at one time Bobdog lived in the single cottage by Redlands Farm; along Ryarsh Lane, West Malling.
    Redlands Farm would have been named for the type of soil – the red clay which was used for manufacturing brick and roofing tile in the Malling Rural District.
    One of the several prominent manufacturing companies was named Redland Tile; they were based in Ightham.

  33. I’ve had a note pushed through my letter box, imploring me to submit a comment concerning the fielder.
    It mentions his impressive athleticism, which when accompanied by taking gingko biloba tablets will be highly beneficial in stimulating his hippocampus.
    It added that he would be far superior to myself when submitting posts of his memories.

  34. My girlfriend seems to be getting slightly addicted to Bailey’s Irish Cream.
    And thinks I’ve got some money hidden somewhere.
    I don’t know about some city streets being supposedly paved with gold anymore – but she’s been hinting that moving to Poundsbridge might affect me (really her) favourably.

  35. My girlfriend keeps a journal in which she writes about her choices, decisions, experiences; hopes and expectations.
    Flicking a few pages, I see that she’s placed a large Bailey’s Irish Cream sticker at the upcoming Easter weekend section.
    I’m going to hide the other Bailey’s stickers.

  36. There she was last night, my girlfriend sitting in her favourite rocking chair – wearing away the carpet.
    While that fielder was also probably rocking the night away, dancing with an attractive widow or 2.
    I mentioned about the carpet. She became a little sulky – quoting Berra’s Second Law : “Anyone who is popular [like her] is bound to be disliked.”
    Sigh! A reminder for me to buy that bottle.
    Happy Easter all!

  37. Richard Dixon attended The Judd School, Tonbridge, and is acknowledged as one of the ‘famous’ people from Borough Green.
    A chemist of note, he specialized in the thermal and optical properties of matter.
    He was awarded the Rumford Medal in 2004.
    Although I was not named after him – he is sort of a distant relation of mine. His cat did its business by our row of sweet peas.

  38. Touring Fleas Cause a Sensation!
    During October 1889, an exhibition of touring fleas at the Chafford Arms caused great mirth and amusement and attracted many inquisitive village and hamlet folk.
    The talented and highly respectable trained and educated troupe of fleas walked tight ropes, rode tricycles, pulled timber wagons and performed many other marvelous feats.
    I’m feeling a bit itchy.

  39. Two Women or Twelve Men.
    There was a fox that had three young ones, and when the time came to fend for themselves, the old fox took them to a house. There was great talk going on inside the house. He asked the first two young ones if they could tell him who was in the house. They couldn’t. Then he tried the third.
    ‘Who is inside?’ asked the old fox.
    ‘Either two women or twelve men,’ said the young one.
    ‘You’ll do well in the world,’ said the old fox.
    ‘Taint allowed ‘eard modern times at Chafford Arms, or within range of my girlfriend’s hearing – or I’m dinged again for a Bailey’s Irish Cream.

  40. Tell that fielder he’s really getting ‘with it.’
    Shaved heads are so mid-2000’s now – Friar Tucks are making a comeback.
    Watch out Maid Marion!

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